Back to Back Issues Page
Macular Degeneration and Central Vision Loss
February 23, 2022
Hello

Macular Degeneration and Central Vision Loss

Central vision loss is one of several possible symptoms of macular degeneration. When there is a grey, black, blurry or blind spot in the middle of one's vision it is called a central scotoma.

It is possible to have more than one blind spot or scotoma.

Like this picture, there are multiple black spots that are congregated in the central vision. As you can see one's peripheral or side vision remains relatively clear.

The spot may start out as a blurriness in one's central vision and progress to a gray or black spot that blanks out a portion of what one sees.

Those experiencing a central scotoma can compensate for their loss of central vision by using their peripheral vision or what is called a Preferred Retinal Location (where healthy photoreceptor cells reside).



The February 2008 Edition of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience reports that "Reorganization of visual processing is related to eccentric viewing in patients with macular degeneration."

In other words when one compensates for loss of central vision by using peripheral vision or what is called a Preferred Retinal Location, the brain reorganizes as well.

There seems to be a reorganization in the visual cortex. This knowledge may lead to the development of more effective rehabilitation programs or tools to enhance the vision of those with AMD.

Find out more how a central scotoma impacts one's vision and strategies for otpimizing one's peripheral vision.

What is a Central Scotoma and What Strategies Can Help Optimize One's Vision

Leslie Degner, RN, BSN

Better Health for Better Vision

www.WebRN-MacularDegeneration.com

Back to Back Issues Page